Adventures in Budapest: Golden Eagle Pharmacy

That’s not to say I didn’t enjoy my visit. This tiny – only two rooms- museum was utterly charming; an apothecary from a time long forgotten by the world outside. It reminded me of  the Old Operating Theatre a little bit.

Mummy head

The only real note I made read as follows: “mumiaporos?” as labelling was as sparse as my notes, and this the only word attached to this Happy Chappy, or indeed Chappette (right), it left me curious. I ascertained it had something to do with mummies, but what?  Well, Language Lovers, it means ‘Mummy Powder:’ ground-up dead people it seems were something of a Panacaea  once upon a time… Whether this was a genuine mummy head (had the rest of him/her healed the diseased masses of medieval Budapest?) or whether this was just a reproduction it was unclear. It didn’t really matter to me. All that mattered was that it got me questioning.

‘Slightly witchy’ runs my only other scrawl about this museum. I suppose that this makes a certain kind of sense, witchcraft and medicine do have something of a shared history after all. Or perhaps my pen was inspired by the floating crocodile?  Have a look at these pictures, if ‘Slightly witchy’ isn’t what strikes you, feel free to leave your thoughts below.

The apothecary laboratory at the Golden Eagle

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5 responses to “Adventures in Budapest: Golden Eagle Pharmacy

  1. Dear Jack – I enjoyed this piece. Thanks. My name is Duncan Smith and I’m the author of a book called “Only in Budapest”. I’m about to revise it and had been told the Pharmacy Museum might have closed. Obviously from your post that is not the case. Can you confirm it is alive and kicking? Much obliged – and thanks again – Duncan

    • Hi Duncan,
      I can confirm that the museum was still open in July, but I’m not sure what might have happened since then. Sorry I couldn’t have been of more help, hope the new version of the book does well!

      Jack

  2. Pingback: Adventures in Budapest: SemmelweisMuseum | Jack's Adventures in Museum Land·

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